The View From Above

The last month and a half, our skies have been filled with smoke from too many forest fires.  The smoke on some days was so thick you couldn’t see down the road.  While it made for some unique sunrises and sunsets, and a few good pictures, it was sad.

The last couple weeks we’ve been feeling “fall” in the air.  This past week it was really starting to feel like fall with the change of the weather, our first freeze warnings, and a little bit of rain.

The blessing in the change of the seasons was in the higher country in the form of snow.  In my home state of Montana, they have lost over 1 million acres of beautiful forest land to forest fires.  I will not get into my opinion of why, because this is a happy blog.  They said the only thing that could help Montana put out the fires was snow.  Glorious snow.  We also got the snow in Oregon and rain in Washington state to help with the fires.

At work this past week, the clouds were just beautiful.  And we all know how I love clouds!  I thought it was a good thing I didn’t have my camera at work because I would want to be outside capturing the beauty.  So I waited.

Friday morning (my day off) the Hubby and I went into town for breakfast and it was awesome to see white puffy clouds and clear blue skies. No smoke on the horizon.  We did some shopping and while we were in the stores, we came out and our puffy white clouds were gone and our skies were filled with white and gray clouds.   I think they were calling to me.  So we drove home to grab the cameras and go above it all.

To the top of a mountain called “Hamaker”

“1958-1979 A Cold War Air Force Radar Station was first established in Keno, Klamath County Oregon.  Named Keno Air Station”

To me, the above sentence is merely a “golf ball” on the top of Hamaker that we can see from our house.  But, there is history up on that mountain top.

Hamaker 11

 

Keno Air Force Station.  Established in 1958 and became operational in September 1958, manned by the 827th AC&W Squadron.  The station initially had both a Ground-Control Intercept (GCI) and early warning mission.  The early warning mission involved tracking and identifying all aircraft entering their airspace while the GCI mission involved guiding Air Force Interceptors to any identified enemy aircraft.  Controllers at the station vectored fighter aircraft at the correct course and speed to intercept enemy aircraft using vice commands via ground-to-air radio.

I could go on about the logistics and big words I didn’t understand in the article, but it is pretty interesting.  You can find more information here:

http://www.fortwiki.com/Keno_Air_force_Station

My story is this… It was a beautiful day in the Basin and the clouds were abundant and we were going to the top of that mounting to get some fresh air and beautiful views, and hopefully some pictures too.

It’s about and 8.5 mile drive to the top which is about 6500 feet. Don’t quote me on that, I was looking at the GPS on my phone.

We had been up here before when we first moved to the area.  I know it gets a lot of snow.  Hubby decided one day in March, to go on an adventure and travel to the top.  I am extremely glad I wasn’t with him. The last mile or so isn’t maintained.  It’s bad enough without the snow.

Hamaker snow 02

He made it back slowly to tell about it!

Once on top of Hamaker, you can look to the northwest and see Mt. McLoughlin, which you can also see from Medford on the other side of the Cascades.

Hamaker 06                                      Mt McLoughlin with a fresh blanket of snow!

You look out to the north, you see the Klamath Basin, farmland, Klamath Lake, Klamath River, and points beyond.  I truly love it up here.  Except it was 43 degrees and a light breeze.  Once the breeze quit, it was quite nice!

Hamaker 01

Hamaker 03

Hamaker 07

Hamaker 10

Hamaker 08

Hamaker 12

There is one thing for sure, that you can’t deny.  It is beautiful here every season.  (except fire season)

My advice is this;

If it’s the beginning of fall where you are, put on that hoodie or flannel shirt, pack the camera, maybe a picnic lunch, and go find your view from the top!  You won’t be sorry.  If it’s not feeling like fall, wait a couple weeks!  It might skip fall and go right into winter.  I say this because it almost always gets really cold or snows before Halloween!

Enjoy fall.  Enjoy the Pumpkin Spice everything.  Enjoy life.

Just a girl and her suitcase 01_01

Happy Shooting

Tracy Lynn

 

Signs

“Signs, Signs, Everywhere there’s signs

Blocking out the scenery. Breaking my mind

Do This! Don’t Do that! Can’t you read the signs”

Thank you Five Man Electric Band, 1971

My husband and I were just on vacation.  Traveling from the Southern Pacific Northwest of Oregon to the lands of South Dakota and back.  3950 miles in all.  This also included side trips and perhaps one or two U-turns.  I wasn’t driving nor was I navigating.  Had I been navigating, there would have been no U-turns.

I love traveling with my husband.  We talk a lot and I take a kazillion pictures through the bug smeared windshield and the side windows and sometimes we even stop to get a good picture!  He’s really good at stopping for me though.  This year was just as fun as those in the past. Although we spent more time driving this year than at our actual destinations.

We traveled through the barren lands of Eastern Oregon, took windy roads in and out of Idaho and Montana, and we took highways that I even wonder why they were on the map and who put them on the map!

But small towns are great. If it weren’t for these highways we’d have not seen the sights that we did.  At one time I am sure these small highways were major thoroughfares!  But now they seem off the beaten path.  Kind of reminds me of the movie Cars, where the new highway was built and the little towns slowly diminished.  Kind of like the old Route 66.  Something I would love to travel one day.

Small towns are proud.  We were traveling  on the 3rd and 4th of July.  The towns were abundant with patriotic colors and the flying of Old Glory down main street.

As we went through these towns that were off the major interstates, I decided to find a common theme to shoot.  I originally started out shooting water towers, but not all towns have them, and some of them were to hard to read. So I stuck with signs. All kinds of signs, from Diners, to Theaters and Motels and Bars.  They were old school.

 

Backroads Diner

Bllue Fox Theatre

They were colorful and then they were literally embedded into the buildings.

Baker MT

I wonder what happens to this building if they decide to close the Lake Theatre.  I guess it’s still a cool old building built in 1918 in Baker Montana.

I kind of wonder though, why the Busy Bee Cafe and Dining room has a horse on it.  Wouldn’t it make more sense  to have a bee?  Or was that to hard to find? Did someone have this horse in their garage just waiting for a place to put it?

Busy Bee Cafe Montana                           Perhaps the Busy Bee Cafe could sell it to the Mustang Motel.

Mustang Motel Montana

Speaking of Motels…

Roys Motel MT

I did not notice until looking at this picture that the answer to “do you have a vacancy” was either Yep or Nope.  Now, how confusing is this to a foreign traveler that only recognizes Vacancy or No Vacancy.  Well, they are in the “Wild West” of Montana, so maybe they do understand.  If you look at the bottom of the sign you can see the faint Yep and Nope.   Good Humor Roys’ Motel!

bbq bar and grillI am hungry, but now I am so confused.  BBQ is one way and Bar & Grill another.  Isn’t BBQ a grill?  And which way am I really supposed to go?

UPstairs MT

I do however, know that I need to go Upstairs to the Steakhouse and Bar in this town.  I really liked the ornate old fashioned look of this sign.

Central Hotel in Oregon

Central Hotel, somewhere in Central Oregon, is pretty old fashioned as well.  I am wondering if it was supposed to be an old telephone receiver, or just a cool way to get Central on the sign.  You can also have Chinese food and play the Oregon Lottery while staying here.

Signs are everywhere.  One of my most unfavorite signs of the trip.  “Road Construction Ahead”  We hit a lot of it.  I totally understand the roads need to be maintained in the summer because of harsh winters.  We went through some construction that literally was dirt and mud.  No road anywhere.  It was a twisty canyon that seemed to have some slides during the winter that may have wiped out the roads.  Once we made it back to asphalt and the pilot car started leading the other side of the road, I noticed there was a bicyclist preparing to make the trek through the construction.  Good Luck Dude!  I know how skinny bike tires like mud.  And there wasn’t a road so I have no idea how successful he was.  Maybe some nice person with room in their truck, helped him through the construction.

I attempted to capture the green signs as you entered a town, you know the one that says the name and the population.  But they came up to soon most times.  So I stuck with all the different kinds of signs that drew in your attention.

Most creative sign goes to the Pioneer R staurant.

pioneer

Not to be outdone by the Pioneer Cafe, where I can get some  Good Homestyle Cookin’ and Pure water for my coffee and tea.   Okay….

Pioneer Cafe Montana

 

Everyone knows that bars have unique signs.  We were traveling in the daytime, so you can’t tell how lit up the signs would be at night.  Guess we need to use our imagination. Some bars are straight and to the point.

Plevna MT Bar                                 I think the patrons are probably more lit than the sign.

A few unique bar signs in old towns.

Two Dot Bar Sign

Two Dot is an actual town in Montana.  It has one road in and out.  And a park and a convenience store.  I had always heard of  Two Dot, but never knew where it was, until we were off the beaten path!

Bison Bar MT                                               Every western town needs a Bison Bar

Buffs Bar Montana                              I wonder who Buff was. Maybe I don’t want to know.

Cannonball North Dakota                                 Three Cheers for the Saloon.  What pray tell is an Off Sale?

Iron Horse Saloon Montana                      This Iron Horse Saloon is in a railroad town in Eastern Montana.

Seven Devils                  To me the Seven Devils Saloon looks like a fake movie set.  I bet you can get a good charred steak!

Montana Bar                             You can pretty much tell, what state we are in with this sign.

Montana Motel Montana                                                                     Go Spartans!

Hotels, and Motels, and Inns.  I know there is a difference. But they all have the same things right?

Red Rock Inn MT

Parma Inn

Sagebrush MT                                 Not sure where the Sagebrush fits in on this one.

Sahara Motel                               Yay, they have in room coffee and obviously electricity!

The Plaza Miles City MT                                  I bet in its time this Plaza sign could be seen for miles!

In almost every old town, there is a theatre. Those signs always catch our eye!

Bllue Fox Theatre

Even if they’re painted on the side of a building.  Why not use the space you have on an old building for advertising. Whoever came up with that idea way back when, was pretty smart!

Sign on Building Montana

Selway Bar

You can’t get away from signs.  I like the old signs.  Classic old hotel signs.  Not your new franchise signs.  Everyone knows what McDonalds is without even seeing a sign.

Two LadiesThis sign hurt my eyes. If it wasn’t early morning, I wouldn’t have known what it said.

Riggins Motel             And the correct Font would be nice.  I wasn’t sure if it was Riggins or Piggins.

Give me a simple to understand sign.  One that doesn’t require a degree to figure out what you really want me to know.

The Griddle    I know for a fact I can get Good Cookin’ at The Griddle and I bet some great Flap Jacks!

Cattlemens              And without spelling it out, I bet I can get a good steak at the Cattlemen’s.

Granite MTN    I can get a Pepsi at Granite MTN cafe.  I think they didn’t want to pay to spell MTN out.

Lariat Bar Roxy Theatre Montana                After the movie at the Roxy I can head to the Lariat Bar for a night cap.

Riverdance LodgeYou can just hear the Celtic music at this Lodge.  All the river dancing going on after hours!  I imagine the River Dance Lodge was here before the craze.

Say When                              Very unique Nevada.  At least it doesn’t “Say Uncle”

There are simple signs as well that let you know exactly what you can get.

Snack Stop                             You can’t however, get chips here. According to the sign.

Muffys mT                              You can probably get your chips here if it’s convenient.

 

There are some signs you must read and you must follow the instructions.

I honestly hate seeing this sign.

Rattlesnakes

And it is something that you really need to pay attention too.  This was at a rest stop in South Eastern Montana.  While I was reading the sign, and mother was having her children run up and down the side of a grassy hill. Most likely not thinking about the fact there might be rattlesnakes.  She was probably trying to get them to get rid of some energy.  I just shudder at that thought.

Toro

Please, Please Please, watch out for Toro in Nevada.  You never know where he may be.  Good Job Nevada!  Most other states have cows. You have Toro!   Ole’

You have to have a sign to tell you where you are as well!

Welcome to SD

I know I am in South Dakota and I can see the presidents at Mt Rushmore!  Good Job South Dakota! Way to represent your state!

Welcome to ND

Welcome to Idaho

Dear North Dakota and Idaho, you need to step up your game.  I am not excited by your welcome!

My favorite sign of the trip?  Thats easy to guess

Welcome to Mt

Montana has many different signs.  They’re all cool, or perhaps I just think that because I am home.

It was another wonderful trip to put in the books.

When you are out and about, take a look at your town.  I have seen faded writing on the brick buildings in Klamath Falls, that indicate there was a hopping down town district.  And look for the dates on the old brick buildings!  You will be amazed what might be in your little town!

The best sign of the trip, really wasn’t a sign. It was the sound of our dogs barking as we pulled our truck into the driveway after a long trip.  Those dogs were saying Welcome Home!

Enjoy the rest of your summer!!!  Go outside and shoot some signs!!!

Make wonderful memories!

Happy Shooting

Tracy Lynn

 

Explore and Experience Your Local Wildlife Refuge

When we first learned that we were moving to the Southern Pacific Northwest, we naturally started to research the area in which we were going to move to. The Klamath “Basin”, Klamath Falls Oregon.

One thing we have learned or I learned since I moved up here first, was this is not a valley.  Unlike Southern California, where you have San Fernando Valley, Simi Valley, Antelope Valley, etc … you get the picture. They’re all surrounded by mountains. So therefore it’s a valley.  I totally get that. I lived there for many years. Even in my home state of Montana, I lived in the Bitterroot Valley. But… Klamath Falls is the “Basin”
Here is the difference according to the search I did and we all know everything is true on the internet.

A basin is a depression or hollow on the earth’s surface, which is surrounded by higher land. A valley is also a depression or hollow between hills, mountains and uplands. A basin, which is also called a watershed, is the part of land that is drained by a river and its various tributaries.

So, I will go with the Basin idea, now that I know what the difference is. Kind of. It dates back to lots of history about the Klamath Watershed, and all the other shenanigans dealing with water in this area.

All that said, in doing the research of this area, it was learned that Klamath Falls is located on the “Pacific Flyway”

The Pacific Flyway is a major north-south flyway for migratory birds in America, extending from Alaska to Patagonia. Every year, migratory birds travel some or all of this distance both in spring and in fall, following food sources, heading to breeding grounds, or travelling to overwintering sites.

You can bet that once I learned that, I was all about what kinds of birds migrated to this area.

A large number of bald eagles winter in Bear Valley, located 10 miles (16 km) west of Klamath Falls, near Keno.

Yay!  Bald Eagles!  Last time I saw them in a large number was in 1981 when they followed the spawning habits of the Kokanee Salmon.  Which sadly, I learned a few years ago, they no longer converge on the waters of Glacier Park for this yearly event.

Eagle 04 Blog

Bear Valley, is close to where we live. It is part of the Klamath Basin National Wildlife Refuge Complex.

The complex consists of several refuges;

Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge    https://www.fws.gov/refuge/lower_klamath/

Tulelake National Wildlife Refuge    https://www.fws.gov/refuge/tule_lake/

Clearlake National Wildlife Refuge   https://www.fws.gov/refuge/clear_lake/

Upper Klamath Lake National Wildlife Refuge    https://www.fws.gov/klamathbasinrefuges/upperklamath/upperklamath.html

Bear Valley National Wildlife Refuge    https://www.fws.gov/refuge/bear_valley/

Klamath Marsh National Wildlife Refuge   hyperlink not available.

The Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge was  Established by President Theodore Roosevelt in 1908 as the Nation’s First Waterfowl Refuge.  

HAwk 01 blog

The Tulelake National Wildlife Refuge was Established in 1928 by President Calvin Coolidge “as a preserve and breeding ground for wild birds and animals“.

Clear Lake Refuge in northeastern California consists of approximately 20,000 acres of open water surrounded by over 26,000 acres of upland bunchgrass, low sagebrush, and juniper habitat. Small, rocky islands in the lake provide nesting sites for American white pelicans, double-crested cormorants, and other colonial nesting birds.  Clear Lake is not open to public access.

Upper Klamath Refuge was established in 1928 and is comprised of 15,000 acres of mostly freshwater marsh and open water. These habitats serve as excellent nesting and brood rearing areas for waterfowl and colonial nesting birds including American white pelican and several heron species. Bald eagle and osprey nest nearby and can sometimes be seen fishing in Refuge waters. A boat is a must for those who wish to explore this refuge. A marked canoe trail is open year round and canoes may be rented nearby. 

Bear Valley Refuge was established in 1978 to protect a vital night roost site for wintering bald eagles. The refuge consists of 4,200 acres, primarily of old growth ponderosa pine, incense cedar, white and Douglas fir.  Bear Valley National Wildlife Refuge also serves as a nesting habitat for several bald eagle pairs. Bear Valley is also closed to public access.

Now that you’ve had your history lesson….
As I mentioned I live near Bear Valley. It is an amazing sight to see Bald Eagles flying over the top of the house, either coming into the area or flying away from. Most likely they’re flying to the Lower Klamath Refuge which is about a ½ hour drive from where we live.
My husband and I are learning the roads in and out of the Lower Klamath Refuge.

Along the state-line highway (Oregon and California) you can make a turn onto the “Willows” road. This road is a line of willow trees that the Eagles nest in. Why they chose this row of trees I will never know. You can see Eagles, both Golden and Bald, Hawks and Owls in these trees. It is a really cool spot to photograph. The trees just by themselves without the awesome Eagles are interesting. They would make for some awesome scary tree collages in Photoshop. (another story for another time)willow for blog 01

This is really my “first” year photographing the birds in this area.  I mean, I’ve walked around Discovery Marsh, which is located at the Tulelake NWR, and have photographed Egrets, Pelicans and Ducks.  But these past few months have been about the Eagles and Hawks.

The beginning of February, we were able to see the Bald Eagles on Township road, which is a way I go to and from work, and we use it to come home from town.  Sometimes along our route to town or to breakfast in Malin, we would count Hawks and Eagles and our numbers would be in the 20’s  for hawks and the Teens for the Eagles.  Now that it’s nesting season, they aren’t around as much. I also imagine it has a lot to do with the farmers flooding the fields, so the mice and whatever hang out in the fields, have moved to higher ground.

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On our weekly trek to Malin for breakfast, we pass the Willows Road and we wind through the Refuge on the gravel roads.

Where eagles nest blog

I have mentioned Malin Oregon before, but if I haven’t done so here, it is a farming community about 45 minutes from where we live.  My husband and I have been known to take a 6 hour round trip to and from Malin, via the way of the Refuge and Lava Beds National Monument.  All for the perfect “shot of the day”.   I never would have imagined we would spend such fun times most every weekend (weather depending) touring around. It’s awesome.  And I discovered that is makes sense to take two cameras out instead of one. We can both shoot to our hearts content.

Tlynn Shooting blog copy

Shooting blog

I was saddened when we were headed out one weekend day and were getting ready to turn down the “Willows” road and it was CLOSED

Eagle no parking 01blog

I totally understand though.  The eagles are nesting and the Refuge does this to reduce disturbances for the Eagles and other nesting birds.  I did so love that drive to see them all. In hopes of a great photo op!  The best were when the eagles were on the closer side of the road.

Eagle 09 blog

Bald and Goldens in Tree blog

If you haven’t experienced your local Wildlife Refuge, I encourage you to do so.  Take a little time away from the rat race of the city noise and your electronic devices,  find a refuge, or even a park,  just to unplug. Listen to the sounds of the nature.

Eagle and Shasta Blog

There is more to see on our  refuge than Eagles.  We have many migrating birds, Snow Geese, Tundra Swans,  Canada Geese, Greater White Fronted and lots of ducks. Right now the Coots are abundant and not so bright, but you can see  Northern Shovelers that look like a Mallard but they’re bills are black and shaped different, Buffleheads, Golden Eye, Ruddy Ducks, Pintail Ducks and a host of other ducks!  We were lucky enough to see Sandhill Cranes, a bit off the Refuge, but they are here as well. Soon we’ll have the White Pelicans, and other summer type birds, more Herons, Egrets, and Raptors.

Tundra Swans blog

Geese and Swans 02 blog

Golden 02 blog

Sandhill 01 blog

I am learning a lot more than I ever thought I would about birds.   It’s fun to ID a bird once you’ve seen it.  I am fortunate to work where most of the men hunt, so they can ID a duck or goose for me.

Shasta birds blog 01

I hope to visit a couple different Wildlife Refuges while the husband and I explore different areas this summer.

Even if you don’t have a camera, take a day trip.  Use your cell phone camera,  find a path to hike, a dirt road to drive down, something that gets you out of the house after a long winter!

Best of all.. Record your trips, and Have Fun.

The End Blog

Be Good Humans

T Lynn

Find Your Shot for the Seasons

Happy New Year!

Wishing you an amazing 2017!

Every Saturday the hubby and I go to breakfast to a small town called Malin. It’s about a 45 minute drive. Sometimes longer if I find something to shoot along the way.

I take my camera every time we go because you just never know what you might see along the way.

The route is along the California/Oregon border and it goes along side the Lower Klamath Basin National Wildlife Refuge.  Hawks, Owls, Falcons, Ducks, Geese, Pheasants and Eagles are abundant, depending on the time of year.

Along this route are awesome trees along the waters edge.  With water, comes canals, bridges, and culverts.

I have my favorite trees and favorite culvert.  Don’t ask why.  It just calls to me!

Years ago I read an article about getting out of a “funk” if you are having no inspiration while shooting with your camera. One of the things that stayed with me in this article, is find a place that you can shoot for all four seasons. Mark that same spot and shoot it 4 times a year. It’s different for all seasons.

Obviously on public land you can’t really mark your spot with spray paint, but you can do so on your own land, or find a landmark that you can only shoot from one such spot.

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This is the culvert that calls to me.  This was taken in March.  Spring wasn’t quite here yet, but patches of green gave hope that spring wasn’t to far behind and winter was long gone!

may-culvert

This is the culvert at a different angle taken in May. The water was low, but the skies were blue and the grasses were green and the clouds were perfect for HDR!

I missed Fall.  I missed the canal when it was drained. But I will of course get the shot this fall.  The culvert isn’t going anywhere!

culvert-seasons-blog

Hello Winter.  A beauty in it’s own little cold way.  It makes the rocks and weeds stand out.  It’s not quite 100% winter.  But a light dusting lets you know it’s on its way.

culvert-back-for-blog

Let’s not forget the back side of this soon to be famous culvert.  I feel it needed to be represented as well.  I will admit, I have not shot this view very many times.  Usually the sun is in the right spot on the way to Malin to shoot from the other side.

This is my Shot for the Seasons.

In posts to come, I will share with you the trees along the banks of the refuge waters.  They’re great in the fall and winter once the leaves have fallen off.  The hawks are much easier to spot in the trees!  But all seasons, the trees are a beauty of their own.

Find a place you want to shoot for your seasons!  I know that even a city has some beauty of its own. I just prefer small town rural America for mine!

Grab your camera, your best shooting buddy (mine is my husband) and go have some fun!

Happy Shooting!

Be Good Humans

T Lynn

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Hello… It’s Me…

Hello to you all.  I hope you have had an amazing year!  Yes, I am only 11 months behind on writing anything.  Time just gets away!

It’s been a crazy year.  A lot of photography going on, since we live in an amazing place.

The Mystical Forest.  That’s what we call our little home on the mountain!

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Yes, even though this was in the winter of last year.  It’s our amazing home in the forest.

We finally closed on our home in April of 2016.  And the games now begin with projects and all the other fun things that comes with owning a home.

It’s been a busy time with photography.  We have enjoyed the mule deer this summer. And they’ve become stars on the trail cam!!

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And every time we go to breakfast on the weekend, I always have my camera.  So Mt. Shasta has been shot a lot.

I don’t think a day goes by that I don’t use some form of camera.  My iPhone has been snapping away daily.  I changed jobs in April, so there are a lot of things to see on the way to work and home and while I am at work!!!

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This is Discovery Marsh, at the Klamath Basin National Wildlife Refuge Complex, in Tulelake California.  An amazing place to get away from the desk and take a walk.

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On the way home from work.  Now that the time has changed.

I could post a thousand pictures of my commute.  But I wont do it all in one day.  I’ll be gentle.

I am hoping… key word hoping, that I can post 1 photo a day for 2017.  I will attempt to do current photos.  But sometimes I just might have to dig through the archives.

Have an amazing day.  Stay safe and Be nice.

Tlynn

My First White Christmas in over 30 Years

Hello World!  It’s me.  Not doing a great job at keeping up with a photography blog, but I am ready to Rock N Roll with the upcoming New Year.  So….. As the title says.   This is my first white Christmas since 1983. I was in Eastern Montana.  Honestly, it has been snowing off and on since before Thanksgiving.  I am ready to be able to drive to work on clear dry roads.

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This is our back yard.  It is pretty! And I haven’t shot snow pictures in years.  I mean, “Real” snow pictures. Of course we had our snow in the desert about 2008, where they closed the base we worked at (Edwards Air Force Base) because we had about 3 inches of snow. And we all know how California people drive bad enough when it rains.. Add snow.. It was ugly.

Today is Christmas. Merry Christmas.

Christmas snow 02 bp

This is just down the road from our house. Taken today.  I love it. I just wish it wasn’t so cold on the fingers to shoot outside.

There are good things about snow, the dogs don’t seem to mind it. This is their first real winter. My Charlie boy is starting to look like a bear!  But he doesn’t complain!  The little dog, she is freezing off her girl parts. And the old dog, she tolerates it.

_MG_9084 copy  He just knows there’s something good underneath all this snow.  It was a pine cone!

There are bad things about winter.  I forgot about the shoveling, the getting stuck ( I haven’t yet) and the crappy roads. We live on a pretty steep incline, so my trusty 4 wheel drive aka “Mama Bear” has gotten me up the hill, down the hill, across the bridges, and to work daily!   However, we don’t even own a real snow shovel. Dear Husband attempted to buy one, most of the stores laughed!  This area hasn’t had snow like this in about 5 years (lucky us) So old school way of shoveling snow.. use a flat shovel.

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New school way of shoveling….  Use the Deere!!

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He looks extremely cold.  Nice green stocking cap too! (I made that!)

Thanks for following my first winter adventure!  See you soon.. I promise!!!

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Peace and Love

TLynn

Restoring Color on Faded Photos

Greetings to you all.

I hope spring has sprung where you are, and you are out and about taking great pictures of spring flowers and life!

I have been home re-cooping from knee surgery, so I haven’t been able to get out as much as I wanted to enjoy the wonderful weather in the high desert of Southern California.

While I have been home and realize there is nothing on day time television, I broke out some old photos and decided to start scanning.  One of the years I scanned was 1977.  Time and not been good to these photos. Stuck in photo albums with plastic over the page, to “protect” them, kind of faded them. And some had tears, scratches and who knows what on them.

While you can restore a photograph to near perfection with lots of tips and tricks, I have a few tips and tricks that can help you with the basic color restoration.  I was lucky enough to take an online photo restoration class.  I love restoration, but it sure can be time consuming.

In these photos the adjustments were all the same.

 

Create a Levels Adjustment layer

Once the Levels Adjustment box is open; choose the drop down arrow where it says RGB.

Select Red

Once you have this open, move the slider to the left just to the beginning of where the red begins to show on your photo.

Once you have finished the red,  repeat the steps with the Green and the Blue.  Once you do the blue, most of the colors will be back to almost original.

After playing with this for awhile, it will become easier than you thought to bring colors back to some of the old photos you thought you wouldn’t be able to save.

When the color has been corrected, you can then play with the clone tool, spot healing brush and the patch tool (under the healing brush tab).  To fix any tears and scratches or other colors.

I didn’t spend hours on these two photos, but I was able to accomplish what I wanted.  A brighter photo with some basic restoration applied.

Hope you may have learned a little something with this tip.  I am sure there are a zillion ways to do the same thing I just mentioned.  Do what you are comfortable with!!!

Basic color restoration before and after 01

 

 

levels adj for people too
Until Next Time

Happy Shooting

TracyLynn